[Vampires]
Vampire's in litrature (Films)
Film makers have always had a fondness for the Vampire, and over the years they have appeared in many films in many guises.. Sometimes they are even the good guys.. Below are listed some of the better known Vampire films, with a short descripion telling what they are about :-





The Lostboys
Sleep all day, Party all night. Never grow old. Never Die.
It's fun to be a vampire.

LostBoys

The Classic cult vampire film, that inspired a generation. This is the film that most lovers of the vampire scene got their addiction from, though a good number of them refuse to admit that thay have a copy of this film.

It featured young rebal vampires that were protrayed to the younger generation as cool and fun as aposed to the older vampires in films such as Dracula. It was also made popular with heartthrob actors such as Kiefer Sutherland, and a great sound track.
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Interview with the Vampire
Interview

In a darkend room a young man sits telling the macabre and eerie story of his life... the story of a vampire, gifted with external life, cursed with an exquisite craving for human blood.
The film `interview with the vampire` is based on the first book in the Vampire chronicles written by Anne Rice, it's main character is a vampire called Louis and its his story.
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Dracula
Love never dies
Dracula

Director Francis Ford Coppola returns to the original source of the Dracula myth, and from the gothic romance, he creates a modern masterpiece.
It follows the tortured journey of the devastatingly seductive Transylvanian Prince (Gary Oldman) as he moves from Eastern Europe to 19th century London in search of his long lost love Elisabeta, who is reincarnated as the beautiful Mina (Winona Ryder). Anthony Hopkins co-starts as the famed Doctor Van Helsing and Keanu Reeves is Jonathan Harper who is forced to fight the dark forces of Dracual for the love of Mina.
Visually stunning, passionately seductive and utterly irresistable, this is Dracula as you've never seen him before - a powerful and poignant vampire whoes yearning for human love ultimately proves his undoing.
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Buffy the Vampire Slayer
Buffy

This feeble spoof works better as a sendup of bimbo Valley girls than a take-off of vampire movies. But as entertainment it doesn's work at all. Blonde, bouncy Kirsty Swanson is the bare-brained cheerleader of the title, who is sudenly informed by mysterious stranger Donald Sutherland that a vampire invasion is imminent and she has been chosen to act as a distaff Van Helsing. This entails her taking on sinister Dracul-type Rutger Hauer and his cackeling henchman Paul Reubens (Pee-Wee Herman). After biting a few teens and crashing a Carrie type prom, the vamps get theirs in a pathetic finale. Swanson is quite good, but thefilm doesnt do her justice. Shot like a TV sit-com, its all rather sad that this was a modest box office hit, but thats probably down to the prescesnce in the cast of then screen harthrob Luck Perry (Beverly Hills 90210)
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Nosferatu
A symponey of horrror
Nosferatu

First of many films based on Stoker's Dracula. This was an unauthorized film, and it disappeared when Stoker's widow took out an injunction against it. However, Nosferatu was preserved by movie pirates and has been reissued in various versions.
Max Schreck plays the vampire as a giant, human rat with an enlarged head, fangs, and talons; he is at once horrifying, ludicrous, and pitiful.
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Blades
Blade Poster

Adapted from the comic books, "Blade" stars Wesley Snipes as Blade, a half human, half vampire man who's on a personal mission to rid the world of vampires since his mother was killed by a vampire. With a whole set of vampire killing tools, including silver bullets ("crosses don't do squat") and his own set of Xena-ish fighting skills (even has his own lil' funky silver chakram), Blade is set to avenge the death of his mother and to kill all vampires he can get his hands on. Deacon Frost (Stephen Dorff), the man who bit Blade's mother, is the "impure" vampires, so called because he was bitten and turned to a vampire as a child. He is the rebel among the vampire ranks. Frost becomes Blade's main target in his journey to a vampire-free world.

Featuring catchy techno music and one of the coolest vampire death/disintegration scenes I've seen, "Blade" starts out nice, scary, and somewhat involving. As the story goes on, however, some of the excess blood becomes a tad distracting, and the final scene between Deacon and Blade, albeit interesting and exhilarating, is predictable (good guy vs. bad guy. Who's gonna win?). However, everything between the beginning and end can be dissolved into mush if you don't dig this vampire stuff at all. Of course, being in the vampire genre, the movie is loaded with vampire gore and lots and lots of blood, some of which people are liable to cringe at. The plot is way in the background as a result of all this vampire kicking butt, and one may forget why the hell Blade is doing any of this in the first place.
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Vampires
vampires

Don’t let the title fool you -- Vampires is not a horror film. Vampires is a Western set in modern times where the good guys carry big silver crossbows and the bad guys wear long incisors. Plotless and mindless, Vampires is proof that a good director, actor and film personality can make a testosterone-laden movie entertaining.

Jack Crow (James Woods) is a vampire slayer. Scratch that, Crow is a vampire slayer with a serious attitude. Having seen his mother and father fall to vampires, Crow has his mind set on killing all vampires. From childhood, the Catholic Church has raised Crow to be a vampire slayer. The Catholic Church, from an exorcism gone awry, created the first vampire, Valek (Thomas Ian Griffith), centuries ago. As the movie opens, Crow and his team go into action by taking out a whole house of vampires.

After the house incident, Crow has a nasty run in with Valek. Valek is the most powerful vampire because he was the first. Valek escapes Crow’s first attempt to take him out, though Valek ends up biting a hooker before his getaway. Crow uses the hooker (Sheryl Lee) as a vampire-radar of sorts. After being bitten by a vampire, a person doesn’t turn into a vampire immediately. There is a period before the bitten person "turns." During this crucial time a telepathic link is set up between the bitten and the master (the vampire who did the biting). Crow uses the hooker to track down Valek.
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Razor Blade Smile
Razor Blade Smile

This darkly satiric vampire film set in the swinging, Gothic scene of London in the 1990s, arises in 1850, when the beautiful Lilith Silver (Eileen Daly) was a dynamic, headstrong woman and still traditionally "alive." During a pistol duel involving her lover and a sinister, Sir Sethane Blake, Lilith produced a pistol of her own and shot Blake.

Yet, despite inflicting a wound that would have killed a mere mortal, Sir Blake just smiled. Lilith herself was then brutally gunned down and to quote her dying moments:

"That was the day I should have died. However far from things ending, the real fun was about to begin ... stil how was I to know that? Back then I was only human!"

Enamored with Lilith, Sir Blake bestowed the dark gift of the vampire upon her and all eternity became her playground!

Now, 150 years later, Lilith is the most outrageous and seductive woman you'll ever meet. Armed with a coffin full of weapons, she's a contract killer hired to eliminate all members of the mysterious and evil Masonic "Illuminati" sect. Besides being the ultimate guillotine maiden, Lilith in her lascivious style eludes the police who are desperate to discover her identity and end the carnage.

Out fighting Emma Peel, out-dressing Catwoman and busting Barbarella's curves, Lilith is an assassin out for blood...
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Dracula Dead and Loving It
Dracula Dead and Loving It

If you like serious vampire movies than this one is not for you. A typical Mel Brooks film, it makes a satire out of the novel and many of the Dracula movies. And It does it well, from start to finish this is a funny film, up there with "Blazing Saddles", "Airplane", etc. With Leslie Nielsen as Dracula, and a clumsy, exravagant, dracula. and Mel Brooks as his faithfull but dim witted assistent Renfield.

The plot involves Dracula and Renfield leaving Transylvania to take over London and turn pretty ladies into vampires. If you're not stuck up on Vampires being taken very seriosly, and you really enjoy a good, funny film. Then this is the one for you...
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Salems Lot
Salems Lot

In this adaptation of Stephen King's novel, a vampire and his human familiar come to the small town of Salem's Lot to begin a reign of terror. David Soul plays a relatively believable vampire hunter, although his acting at times seems a little forced. The premise and story are fairly good, even with all the adaptations and cuts you find in a novel turned horror movie. My largest disappointment with this film was in the portrayal of Barlow, the "king" vampire. Whether it was a decision of the director or the man who penned the screenplay, the portrayal of Barlow as little more than a grunting animal was a travesty. For those who have read the novel, I'm sure most would agree that what made the Barlow character so compelling and such a worthwhile adversary was his exceptional intelligence. In this film, Barlow resembles nothing so much as the vampire of mythic lore, grunting, discolored and disfigured, with only limited mental faculties. Still, there is enough here for most vampire fans, and fans of the book will enjoy seeing it brought to visual fruition, if a somewhat limited one.
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Return to Salems Lot
 Return to Salems Lot

Loosely based on Stephen King's novel (the only things in common are the town name and the vampires).

Michael Moriarty plays Joe Weber, a professional anthropologist who returns to the town with his adolescent "troublemaking" son, seeking a house willed to him by his late aunt. What he finds is that his aunt is not at all of 'late', as with the rest of the town she is one of the undead.

The Judge, Axel Page

From Dusk Till Dawn
From Dusk Till Dawn

I couldn't believe how bad this film really was. It was as if Quentin Tarentino lacked an ending to a film and asked John Carpenter to finish it for him. The only thing even remotely good about this film was Salma Hayek, Cheech Marin's hilarious (but patently offensive) speech in front of the vampire bar, and the gorgeous Aztec pyramid matte painting at the end.

A ward of warning however, there are some offensive scenes in here and the movie is alas one of the shoot em up - knock em down films.
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Kindred-The Embraced
Kindred-The Embraced

The uneasy peace between five tenuously connected clans of vampires in San Francisco is constantly under siege, maintained at cost of "final death" by Julian Luna, a vampire prince who must mete out justice for infractions committed by the Kindred. A chilling, atmospheric, eight-episode series (in three volumes) based on Mark Rein-Hagen's cult novel, "Vampire: The Masquerade."

For vampire lovers, this is a good item for the collection. Although many familiar with White Wolf's Kindred were horrified by the inaccuracies in this series, when viewed separately it stands on its own as an alternative view into the world of the vampire.
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Fright Night
Fright Night

Holy Cow! What do you do if you're a teenage horror film fan and you realize your new next door neighbor is a vampire? Well if you're Charlie Brewster (William Ragsdale) and you're in this knockout horror movformances from Amanda Bearse as Charlie's girlfriend, Stephen Geoffreys as his weirdo friend Evil Ed, and especially Chris Sarandon as the bloodsucking but smooth vampire, and you have a film guaranteed to knock your socks off! Check it out!

If you're looking for a good, old fashioned vampire frolic, this is a good place to start. This movie has all the traditional elements and it does it in a way that's fun and thoroughly enjoyable. The cinematography is very good for the time, and while the acting can get a bit campy at times, you'll walk away from this one with a smile. Hats off to Chris Sarandon for playing a thoroughly despicable but eminently likeable villain.
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Fright Night Part 2
Fright Night

In typical Fright Night fashion, this film carries on the tradition of trying to be scary and humorous at the same time, and carries it off without too many hitches. The vampire death scenes were very well done, particularly death by holy water and death by sunlight. We didn't get to enjoy the traditional death by staking scene, but it wasn't an obvious omission. All the traditional trappings of the vampire hunter (and I do mean ALL of them!) were there, and the presence of red roses were as particularly nice touch that you don't always see.

Regine Dandridge, vampire and sister to Jerry Dandridge (the vampire in the first Fright Night), is in town and is seeking revenge against Charley Brewster (William Ragsdale) and Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall.) And, to make sure the job is done right, she's brought three friends (another vampire, a Renfield-like walking corpse, and a werewolf.)

Story-wise, this film is purely awful and starts with a contrived beginning. After psycho-therapy, Charley Brewster no longer believmes, hard to follow. Since writer/director Tom Holland had no involvement with this sequel, this comes as no surprise. Visually, though, this film isn't bad -- The monster special effects are of better quality than most horror films. The cinematography is rich and establish a Gothic atmosphere.
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